Anxiety, depression and tigers who are CHILL AF

John Wood Profile Picture

by John Wood · Updated

Did you know that animals in the wild rarely get PTSD?

Tigers. Lions. Hyenas and gazelles. Chipmunks, monkeys and rats.

Incredible, right?

But put them into captivity and they start exhibiting symptoms of PTSD – just like the average human being in the modern world.

Anxiety. Depression. Inability to relax. Digestive problems. Social media addictions.

Why is this?

If you think about it for literally 7.813 seconds, you’ll see that it doesn’t make sense.

While we might struggle to pay rent, fight with a friend or find a romantic partner who’s into inflatable butt plugs (see my recent email), it’s rarely a life-or-death struggle… even with the butt plugs 🍆

But animals in the wild?

They fight for their survival every single day.

They’re one mistake away from being someone else’s lunch – whether ours or another animal’s.

It is literally LIFE OR DEATH.

That shit sounds stressful, right?

Maybe a wee bit more stressful than how we feel when we can’t connect to the WiFi or hell, even pay our rent?

RIGHT!??!???

And yet, animals in the wild rarely end up with PTSD and the various symptoms it comes with.

WTF 🫤

Like I said…

IT DOESN’T MAKE [email protected]?!~!!!!!

Or does it 😏

It turns out that there are some very good reasons for this 👨‍🏫

First, most wild animals have solid, healthy attachment with their parents. Their parents aren’t getting drunk or manipulating them or spending all their time at work. Their parents are with them as long as needed.

Second, most wild animals are IN their body. They don’t sit around thinking about how they almost died today or the 328 days that came before this. They’re chilling. In their body. In the moment. In feeling. PRESENT AF. That means that unlike you and me, they’re not rehashing what happened and therefore, they’re not recreating the stress of the past in the present.

Third (and perhaps most importantly), they are completely and totally themselves. If they’re angry, they growl. If they’re sad, they cry. If they’re hungry, they eat. Tired, they sleep. They don’t block their feelings or rationalise it away. They don’t try to be someone they’re not. They don’t “people please”. They simply follow their impulse with ALL of it.

Now think about humans.

First, most humans do not have solid, secure attachment with their parents.

Second, most humans are perpetually in their heads… worrying about the past and future.

Third (and worst of all), most humans have no idea what it means to be themselves. They’re busy trying to live out some idea of themselves – some idea that makes them feel safe – instead of simply being authentic. Instead of simply being who they are.

Can you now see why most wild animals don’t get PTSD despite being in a fight for their life every day?

And why so many humans end up with all kinds of weird and wonderful issues like anxiety, depression, procrastination and being a rusty, weird caricature of our true self?

This is why I say Rageheart is about unleashing the beast:

First, you learn how to build a solid, healthy, secure attachment to yourself (to replace the unhealthy, insecure attachments you might’ve had with your parents or caretakers).

Second, you discover what it means to be IN your body (instead of in your head).

Third (and my favourite part of all), you remember who you are. Not who you THINK you are. Who you ACTUALLY are. Without all the filters and qualifications and BS that’s been piled on top thanks to decades of unresolved stress responses.

See what I mean?

Rageheart is about unleashing the wild beast inside you – in a healthy, safe and contained way 💪

If you want to unleash the wild beast inside you, sign up for a FREE trial before it closes to new members at midnight tonight:

https://www.rageheart.co/app/

If you’re already a member and feeling the impulse of the beast (Rage 9), hit the sign in link on that page and do another rage.


“…harder than I expected, but once I got used to it… it silenced my mind like never before.”LOGAN HOBSON

​Cheers,

John Wood

Leave a Comment